• Bath University develops biodegradable microbead...

    Friday, August 11, 2017

    Scientists and engineers from Bath University’s Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies (CSCT) have developed a way of producing a biodegradable renewable alternative to plastic microbeads in a scalable,…

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  • Weleda’s arnica hits the road

    Friday, August 11, 2017

    Weleda has unveiled a new Arnica Recovery Vehicle, which will tour sports events and sports festivals over the summer, as a mobile unit offering arnica relief to weary…

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  • Kinetic streamlines trade website

    Friday, August 11, 2017

    Kinetic Distribution has launched a new trade website to streamline ordering and add media assets. The new site is easier to navigate and search, as well as being…

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  • Vitamin E could slow dementia

    Friday, August 11, 2017

    Daily Vitamin E supplements could help to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study published in JAMA . 613 people with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease…

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  • British feel misled over beauty labelling

    Friday, June 9, 2017

    New research by the Soil Association reveals that 76% of people feel misled by some beauty labelling. The new research, released as part of its Campaign For Clarity,…

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  • BetterYou introduces turmeric spray

    Friday, June 9, 2017

    The latest addition to the range at BetterYou has seen the launch of the world’s first Turmeric Oral Spray. Using molecular encapsulation, the new spray guarantees superior absorption…

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  • Wiley’s Finest launches Vitamin K2 product at ...

    Wednesday, April 26, 2017

    Wiley’s Finest Wild Alaskan Fish Oil, the Omega-3 supplement brand that uses only certified sustainable, responsibly sourced Alaskan fish, launched a new Vitamin K2 product at the Natural…

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  • incognito features on BBC’s Rip Off Britain

    Wednesday, March 22, 2017

    Mosquito repellent, incognito, featured in a recent episode of the BBC’s Rip Off Britain. The holiday special, screened on Monday 23rd January 2017, discussed the dangers of contracting…

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  • Eleven new awards for Weleda

    Tuesday, March 21, 2017

    After six months of testing entries from 38 countries, The Beauty Shortlist has announced its new International Beauty Awards, with Weleda receiving 11 accolades on 2 March. This…

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  • NATRUE celebrates 10th anniversary at NOPE

    Tuesday, February 14, 2017

    After last year’s success of the first ever NATRUE Pavilion at Natural & Organic Products Europe at London’s ExCel, the trade association will again host a joint stand…

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Aug
11

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Bath University develops biodegradable microbeads

Scientists and engineers from Bath University’s Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies (CSCT) have developed a way of producing a biodegradable renewable alternative to plastic microbeads in a scalable, continuous manufacturing process. The beads are made from cellulose, which is the material that forms the tough fibres found in wood and plants. In this process, the cellulose is dissolved and reform into tiny beads by forming droplets that are then “set”. These microbeads are robust enough to remain stable in a bodywash, but can be broken down by organisms at the sewage treatment works, or even in the environment in a short period of time. The researchers anticipate they could use cellulose from a range of “waste” sources, including from the paper making industry as a renewable source of raw material. Their results have been published in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering.

“Microbeads used in the cosmetics industry are often made of polyethylene or polypropylene, which are cheap and easy to make. However these polymers are derived from oil and they take hundreds of years to break down in the environment,” says Dr Janet Scott (pictured), reader in the Department of Chemistry and part of the CSCT. “We’ve developed a way of making microbeads from cellulose, which is not only from a renewable source, but also biodegrades into harmless sugars. We hope in the future these could be used as a direct replacement for plastic microbeads.”

Aug
11

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Weleda’s arnica hits the road

Weleda has unveiled a new Arnica Recovery Vehicle, which will tour sports events and sports festivals over the summer, as a mobile unit offering arnica relief to weary muscles.

The tour kicked off with Keswick Mountain Festival in June, where participants were offered mini arnica massages at the finish line for the various outdoor sports activities which included cycling, running, open water swimming and triathlon. The Eroica Britannia Cycling Festival followed on 16-18 June where cyclists entering for the various rides across the Peak District National Park could relax with a soothing foot and calf massage with the aromatic arnica on their return. The tour will also attend the Eden Project Marathon in Cornwall on 15 October, with sampling at further events to be confirmed throughout the summer. Special sample sizes have been produced to introduce the range to people who are embracing an outdoorsy active lifestyle, whether complete beginners or committed sports enthusiasts.

Weleda’s managing director Jayn Sterland commented: “We are excited that our arnica range is going from strength to strength and more people are turning to organic products for sports, discovering the benefits of this amazing plant which is famous for its natural anti-inflammatory properties.”

Aug
11

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Kinetic streamlines trade website

Kinetic Distribution has launched a new trade website to streamline ordering and add media assets. The new site is easier to navigate and search, as well as being more clearly presented. The site will also house all media assets, such as images, descriptions, ingredients and digital banners, to make it easier for retailers to utilise Kinetic’s marketing campaigns. A company blog has also been added to keep up with the latest developments in the business. The url remains the same: www.kinetic4health.co.uk

Aug
11

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Vitamin E could slow dementia

Daily Vitamin E supplements could help to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study published in JAMA . 613 people with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease received either a high daily dose of Vitamin E, memantine (a dementia drug treatment), a vitamin Ememantine combination or placebo and had their progress monitored for more than two years.

The researchers found that those who took Vitamin E only were able to continue carrying out everyday tasks for longer than those receiving placebo, with the annual rate of decline reduced by 19 per cent. No significant effect was seen in the group taking Vitamin E plus memantine, compared with placebo – a result that researchers were unable to explain. There was also no effect with memantine alone.

Dr Doug Brown, director of research and development at the Alzheimer’s Society, said: “Treatments which can help people with dementia carry out everyday tasks are key to enabling those with the condition to live well for as long as possible,” but urged people to consult their healthcare professional before taking supplements.

Jun
9

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British feel misled over beauty labelling

New research by the Soil Association reveals that 76% of people feel misled by some beauty labelling. The new research, released as part of its Campaign For Clarity, also shows that 72% of people said they would lose trust in a beauty brand that made misleading claims about being organic.

The research found that 74% of people said they would feel they were choosing a product which was free from ‘nasties’ if it said organic on the label. Yet the reality is quite different. A leading independent toxicologist reviewed the ingredients found in products which say organic on the label and identified the ‘Terrible Ten’: ingredients which have been shown in wider use to cause problems such as allergies, hormone disruption, or harm to the development of unborn babies. Emeritus Professor Vyvyan Howard of the Centre for Molecular Bioscience at Ulster University, who assessed the ingredients used in the potentially misleadingly labelled products and came up with the ‘Terrible Ten’, said: “I was shocked to find ingredients which could contain human carcinogens in products with labels which could misleadingly suggest that they might be organic. Genuine organic products are independently certified and I would encourage consumers to choose those to be sure they are keeping away from ingredients included in the Terrible Ten.”