• Elderly with low vitamin D should supplement to ...

    Thursday, September 14, 2017

    BetterYou has welcomed new research highlighting the need for the older generation to supplement the sunshine vitamin. A study published in European Journal of Heart Failure1 reported that…

    Read More

  • Colief launches Breathe Easy Patch for children

    Thursday, September 14, 2017

    Vapour patch containing essential oils helps to aid gentle decongestion in children with blocked noses Colief has launched of the Colief Breathe Easy Patch, a gentle decongestant patch…

    Read More

  • Unilever acquires Pukka Herbs

    Thursday, September 7, 2017

    Organic tea company Pukka Herbs has been acquired by Unilever to strengthen its tea business and ‘address a gap’ in its portfolio. Pukka Herbs, which specialises in herbal…

    Read More

  • Bath University develops biodegradable microbead...

    Friday, August 11, 2017

    Scientists and engineers from Bath University’s Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies (CSCT) have developed a way of producing a biodegradable renewable alternative to plastic microbeads in a scalable,…

    Read More

  • Weleda’s arnica hits the road

    Friday, August 11, 2017

    Weleda has unveiled a new Arnica Recovery Vehicle, which will tour sports events and sports festivals over the summer, as a mobile unit offering arnica relief to weary…

    Read More

  • Kinetic streamlines trade website

    Friday, August 11, 2017

    Kinetic Distribution has launched a new trade website to streamline ordering and add media assets. The new site is easier to navigate and search, as well as being…

    Read More

  • Vitamin E could slow dementia

    Friday, August 11, 2017

    Daily Vitamin E supplements could help to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study published in JAMA . 613 people with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease…

    Read More

  • British feel misled over beauty labelling

    Friday, June 9, 2017

    New research by the Soil Association reveals that 76% of people feel misled by some beauty labelling. The new research, released as part of its Campaign For Clarity,…

    Read More

  • BetterYou introduces turmeric spray

    Friday, June 9, 2017

    The latest addition to the range at BetterYou has seen the launch of the world’s first Turmeric Oral Spray. Using molecular encapsulation, the new spray guarantees superior absorption…

    Read More

  • Wiley’s Finest launches Vitamin K2 product at ...

    Wednesday, April 26, 2017

    Wiley’s Finest Wild Alaskan Fish Oil, the Omega-3 supplement brand that uses only certified sustainable, responsibly sourced Alaskan fish, launched a new Vitamin K2 product at the Natural…

    Read More

Sep
14

Author:

Comment

Elderly with low vitamin D should supplement to reduce risk of heart failure

BetterYou has welcomed new research highlighting the need for the older generation to supplement the sunshine vitamin. A study published in European Journal of Heart Failure1 reported that the risk of heart failure was more than 12 times higher in elderly vitamin D deficient participants than those with an adequate level.

These results support findings from a previous study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, which found an association between vitamin D supplementation and reducing the risk of heart failure2.

This research presents more evidence in the importance of having optimal vitamin D levels, with the researchers expressing the need for supplementation. Public Health England advised in an announcement in 2016 that everyone should take a vitamin D supplement in autumn and winter to support healthy bones and muscles3. More specifically, the government suggests that ‘at risk’ groups, which include the elderly, should take a vitamin D supplement all year round. It’s estimated that 10 million people in the UK and one in eight over-50’s in Ireland suffer from low vitamin D levels.

Deficiency can be corrected by using a simple daily vitamin D oral spray that bypasses the digestive system and guarantees absorption. Multiple trials have found that oral vitamin sprays elevate serum vitamin D levels on average 2.5 times more effectively than traditional tablets and capsules4. A pilot study5 by BetterYou and City Assays (part of Sandwell and Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust) demonstrated how a high dose oral spray of vitamin D can increase vitamin D levels and resolve insufficiency/deficiency (below 50 nmol/L or 20ng/ml) to an optimal level (100-150nmol/L or 40-60ng/ml).

 

References

  1. 1. Porto, C. M., Silva, V. D. L., da Luz, J. S. B., Filho, B. M., and da Silveira, V. M. (2017) Association between vitamin D deficiency and heart failure risk in the elderly. ESC Heart Failure, doi: 10.1002/ehf2.12198. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ehf2.12198/full
  2. 2. Cardiovascular disease and vitamin D supplementation: trial analysis, systematic review, and meta-analysis.  July 23, 2014, doi: 10.3945/​ajcn.113.082602 http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/early/2014/07/23/ajcn.113.082602.abstract
  3. 3. SACN vitamin D and health report. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sacn-vitamin-d-and-health-report
    4. A trial by the Swiss research facility Pharmabase found that, over a twelve-week clinical study, the uptake of vitamin D was 67% faster using an oral spray than using traditional tablets of the same strength. The absorption increased to 127% greater if the individual had insufficient levels to begin with. The National University of Athens looked at a similar comparison over only four weeks and found the oral spray to achieve a 52% greater absorption.
    5. Pilot trial – 24 participants, tested (results below 50n/mol) and retested 10 weeks later (using NHS home test kit) throughout 2016.
Sep
14

Author:

Comment

Colief launches Breathe Easy Patch for children

Vapour patch containing essential oils helps to aid gentle decongestion in children with blocked noses

Colief has launched of the Colief Breathe Easy Patch, a gentle decongestant patch which can be worn on clothing or bedding to improve breathing and ease nasal obstruction, particularly at night. Single use and easy to apply, the patch contains a formulation of essential oils including eucalyptus, peppermint, lemon and rosemary oils to aid decongestion and help to ease the discomfort of colds.

“One of the main concerns of parents using essential oil products to ease decongestion is the risk of irritation to the skin, particularly in young children,” said Dawn Kelly, member of the Colief Expert Panel and former health visitor. “The Colief Breathe Easy Patch attaches to nightwear or bedding, minimising any risk of irritation and ensuring the oils remain at a safe distance from children’s airways and delicate skin.”

Babies and children often suffer from colds because their immune system is still developing, and decongestants such as eucalyptus oil can relieve the blocked or runny nose experienced by many children. Clinically tested to last up to eight hours, the natural essential oils in Colief Breathe Easy Patch alleviate nasal congestion and reduce discomfort.

Sharon Skelton, General Manager Europe, Crosscare, said: “As experts in baby health, we are constantly talking to parents to ensure we can meet their needs, and we are excited to launch the Colief Breathe Easy Patch, the latest addition to our range of products for young families.”

The Colief Breathe Easy Patch is suitable for use in children over the age of three, and is available in stores for RRP £5.95 for a pack of six. For wholesale enquiries, contact Forum Health, distributors of Colief products in the UK, at kevan.gill@forumgroup.co.uk.

Sep
7

Author:

Comment

Unilever acquires Pukka Herbs

Organic tea company Pukka Herbs has been acquired by Unilever to strengthen its tea business and ‘address a gap’ in its portfolio.

Pukka Herbs, which specialises in herbal infusions with exotic flavours, has a turnover of over £30 million and growth of around 30%. It was founded in 2001 by Tim Westwell and Sebastian Pole.

With 100% organic and ethically-sourced ingredients, Pukka said its health and wellness philosophy centres around benefiting people, plants and the planet. The company employs around 110 people in Bristol and next year is due to move into Cadbury’s former Somerdale factory in Keynsham.

The sale may raise fears that the independent brand may lose its ethical values as it is snapped up by a multinational corporation. However, Sebastian Pole said that choosing Unilever came down to two fundamentals: scale and sustainability. “It is a leader in social and environmental change and it wholeheartedly embraces Pukka’s beliefs, so there’s a meeting of values,” he said. “Pukka will remain 100% organic and a champion for fair trading through pioneering schemes like Fair for Life, and continue to donate 1% of its sales to global environmental charities. With Unilever, we have new levels of reach and opportunity.”

Unilever’s refreshment category president Kevin Havelock believes that there is a clear ‘strategic, philosophical and cultural’ fit between Pukka and Unilever. “Pukka is a premium player in the natural, organic, health and wellness segment which is fast-growing, attractive and scalable. We look forward to bringing Pukka to even more consumers.”

Aug
11

Author:

Comment

Bath University develops biodegradable microbeads

Scientists and engineers from Bath University’s Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies (CSCT) have developed a way of producing a biodegradable renewable alternative to plastic microbeads in a scalable, continuous manufacturing process. The beads are made from cellulose, which is the material that forms the tough fibres found in wood and plants. In this process, the cellulose is dissolved and reform into tiny beads by forming droplets that are then “set”. These microbeads are robust enough to remain stable in a bodywash, but can be broken down by organisms at the sewage treatment works, or even in the environment in a short period of time. The researchers anticipate they could use cellulose from a range of “waste” sources, including from the paper making industry as a renewable source of raw material. Their results have been published in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering.

“Microbeads used in the cosmetics industry are often made of polyethylene or polypropylene, which are cheap and easy to make. However these polymers are derived from oil and they take hundreds of years to break down in the environment,” says Dr Janet Scott (pictured), reader in the Department of Chemistry and part of the CSCT. “We’ve developed a way of making microbeads from cellulose, which is not only from a renewable source, but also biodegrades into harmless sugars. We hope in the future these could be used as a direct replacement for plastic microbeads.”

Aug
11

Author:

Comment

Weleda’s arnica hits the road

Weleda has unveiled a new Arnica Recovery Vehicle, which will tour sports events and sports festivals over the summer, as a mobile unit offering arnica relief to weary muscles.

The tour kicked off with Keswick Mountain Festival in June, where participants were offered mini arnica massages at the finish line for the various outdoor sports activities which included cycling, running, open water swimming and triathlon. The Eroica Britannia Cycling Festival followed on 16-18 June where cyclists entering for the various rides across the Peak District National Park could relax with a soothing foot and calf massage with the aromatic arnica on their return. The tour will also attend the Eden Project Marathon in Cornwall on 15 October, with sampling at further events to be confirmed throughout the summer. Special sample sizes have been produced to introduce the range to people who are embracing an outdoorsy active lifestyle, whether complete beginners or committed sports enthusiasts.

Weleda’s managing director Jayn Sterland commented: “We are excited that our arnica range is going from strength to strength and more people are turning to organic products for sports, discovering the benefits of this amazing plant which is famous for its natural anti-inflammatory properties.”